In situ vs mining oil sands

Most water used in oil sands development is recycled – 80 percent for established mining operations and approximately 94 percent for in-situ recovery. However, some new water is required and comes from a variety of sources, including on-site drainage, collected precipitation (rain and melt water), underground salt water (brackish) aquifers, and the local watershed such as rivers.

There are only 2 paths to extracting bitumen from the oil sands: by injecting steam deep underground and pumping the oil to surface (thermal in-situ), or; by mining the ore and physically separating the bitumen from the sand in a processing plant. Suncor Energy has been mining the oil sands since the late 1960s. An in-situ processing plant is generally much smaller and simpler than an oil sands mining facility. However, bitumen can only be extracted in-situ if the oil sands deposit is deep below the surface. Most in-situ deposits lie at least 200 meters below grade. In situ operations require more energy than oil sands mining to produce a barrel of bitumen. As a result, in situ operations generate two and half times as much greenhouse gas per barrel of bitumen as oil sands mines (91 kg/barrel vs. 36 kg/ barrel, excluding the emissions associated with bitumen upgrading). In situ oil sands mining. Oil sands deposits that are greater than 75 meters below the ground surface are usually extracted without removing the overlying rock and dirt. This is known as in situ oil sands mining. Oil sands deposits are usually split into two types of deposits.

In-situ extraction methods are used to recover bitumen that lies too deep beneath the surface for mining (greater than 75 metres underground). Currently, 80% of oil sands reserves are accessible via in-situ techniques. Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) is currently the most widely used in-situ recovery method.

There are two different methods of producing oil from oil sands: open-pit mining and in situ. Bitumen that is close to the surface (less than 75 metres) is mined. Approximately 20% of oil sands are recoverable through open-pit mining. Most water used in oil sands development is recycled – 80 percent for established mining operations and approximately 94 percent for in-situ recovery. However, some new water is required and comes from a variety of sources, including on-site drainage, collected precipitation (rain and melt water), underground salt water (brackish) aquifers, and the local watershed such as rivers. In surface mining, companies use trucks and shovels to scoop up oil sands from the ground. The oil sands are then transported to extraction plants, where bitumen (heavy oil) is separated from the sand. A company might decide to sell its extracted bitumen as a product on its own. Alternatively, it might decide to further upgrade the bitumen to synthetic crude oil. In either case, any environmental impacts such as tailings must be managed. But tar sands oil is in a category all its own. Tar sands retrieved by surface mining has an EROI of only about 5:1, according to research released Tuesday. Tar sands retrieved from deeper beneath the earth, through steam injection, fares even worse, with a maximum average ratio of just 2.9 to 1.

There are two different methods of producing oil from oil sands: open-pit mining and in situ. Bitumen that is close to the surface (less than 75 metres) is mined. Approximately 20% of oil sands are recoverable through open-pit mining.

Oil sand mining has a large impact on the environment. Forests must be cleared for both open-pit and in situ mining. Pit mines can grow to more than 80 meters  being mined mainly in Alberta Canada, however, oil companies are now pursuing tar sands mines in the U.S. West. Mining Tar SandS for Crude. Tar sands are  recovered in situ (Latin for in place) by drilling wells. This involves much less surface disturbance than mining operations. In 2013, oil sands were recorded to   13 Feb 2020 Additionally, natural gas is used in oil sands mining to heat water to separate bitumen from sand. It is also used to create steam in upgrading to  in 1928 and still forms the basis of oil sands mining extraction. At the same Major Oil Sands Projects. In Situ. Mining. Mineable Region. Peace. River. Oil of the IHS CERA Multiclient Study Potential versus Reality: West African Oil and Gas. Canada's oil sands deposits are mainly located in northern Alberta, and at present The oil sands are recovered by surface mining and in situ techniques; the latter of Foreign Relation's article “The Canadian Oil Sands: Energy Security vs. 19 Feb 2013 But tar sands oil is in a category all its own. Tar sands retrieved by surface mining has an EROI of only about 5:1, according to research released 

Oil recovery in the oil sands uses two main methods: mining or in situ, depending on how deep the oil sands deposits are. Surface Mining Surface mining is used when oil sands deposits lie within 70 meters (200 feet) of the earth’s surface.

The resource potential for in situ oil sands extraction is huge. Surface mining is only feasible for the shallow oil sands deposits found north of Fort McMurray, which means that 80 percent of the How in situ oil sands companies used water overall and; How individual in situ projects used water. In situ oil sands projects use water in the form of steam and require more water per barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) during the first few years of their lifecycle. These projects recover oil by injecting steam into reservoirs so that bitumen viscosity is reduced to a point where it can flow. In Situ Methods used in the Oil Sands. In situ methods are used to recover bitumen that lies too deep beneath the surface for mining (about 80% of the oil sands in Alberta). The success of in situ methods depends on the resolution of two major issues: 1) reducing the viscosity of bitumen so that it will flow, and 2) recovering In surface mining, companies use trucks and shovels to scoop up oil sands from the ground. The oil sands are then transported to extraction plants, where bitumen (heavy oil) is separated from the sand. A company might decide to sell its extracted bitumen as a product on its own. Alternatively, it might decide to further upgrade the bitumen to In-situ Production In-situ extraction methods are used to recover bitumen that lies too deep beneath the surface for mining (greater than 75 metres underground).   Currently, 80% of oil sands reserves are accessible via in-situ techniques. Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) is currently the most widely used in-situ recovery method.

25 Sep 2014 Giant dump trucks haul raw tar sands at the Suncor tar sands mining Pipelines run at the McKay River Suncor oil sands in-situ operations 

But tar sands oil is in a category all its own. Tar sands retrieved by surface mining has an EROI of only about 5:1, according to research released Tuesday. Tar sands retrieved from deeper beneath the earth, through steam injection, fares even worse, with a maximum average ratio of just 2.9 to 1.

4 Jan 2019 This is known as in situ oil sands mining. Oil sands deposits are usually split into two types of deposits. Shallow deposits are located within  Oil Sands Impacts: Mining vs. In Situ. Note: These values are weighted averages that represent the impacts associated with the production of bitumen. In situ methods are used to recover bitumen that lies too deep beneath the surface for mining (about 80% of the oil sands in Alberta). The success of in situ  In Situ refers to methods of oil sands production that use drilling and steam to to be mined (more than 75 meters deep) and too viscous to flow on its own. There are two main thermal in situ oil sands technologies: steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD); cyclic steam stimulation (CSS). In SAGD, two horizontal wells  In-situ versus Mining Operations - Oil Sands Magazine. In-Situ vs. Mining Production - Oil Sands Magazine. In-situ oil operations in Alberta - Oil Sands Magazine.